THE PRAYER PLACE From Sue Kaiser

THE PRAYER PLACE by Sue Kaiser

LENTEN DISCIPLINE OF PRAYER, FASTING, ALMSGIVING (March 2013)

“If you kept track of sins, Lord— my Lord, who would stand a chance? But forgiveness is with you— that’s why you are honored. I hope, Lord. My whole being hopes, and I wait for God’s promise.” (Psalm 130:2-5 CEB)

Prayerful Lenten activity may include self-examination of our spiritual health and our need to repent. When we know there are places in our lives which need help and healing, it can be a hard thing to do honestly and to seek forgiveness. Some of this was brought home very eloquently at the recent ACE event at Trinity. Dr. Tim Chambers, Pastoral Counselor, and Dr. Tom Burkman, retired UB professor, helped us look at forgiveness and restoration affecting our spiritual/ emotional lives, and at global communities struggling with old wounds.

It was helpful to many to know that forgiveness does not necessarily mean a relationship has been restored, but often becomes the first of several steps needed to restore broken relationships. Hopefully we will be able to continue with the study in a class or small group.

Personally I was so aware of how well the subject of forgiveness fits with Lent and Jesus’ passion on the Cross,

and with His purpose of bringing God’s healing/restoring/ saving power to humankind through His sacrificial act for the forgiveness of the sins of the world.

We Christians know we rely on that saving act to make right and to redeem the huge issues between people and nations. Might we all remember to thank God and our Lord Jesus Christ for this amazing gift to us.

As we continue to journey with Jesus toward the cross, may we feel again His love poured out for us and the world – love which allows us to forgive what may seem impossible, and to go on with life - encouraged to find peace and harmony.

Blessings as you find what God has to offer those who truly want to be restored in relationships.

Thank you to all who participated in the Ash Wednesday Prayer Vigil . . . and who continue to pray.